Frequently Asked

How are you handling COVID?


We have taken the proper health precautions to prevent the spread of COVID. Along with an extensive phone verification process, we take temperatures and limit the amount of patients in the office. Please refer to our home page for the COVID information page for detailed procedures & precautions.




How can I become a patient?


We are currently accepting new patients. Call our office or contact through our website




What should I bring to my first appointment?


Bring your health forms provided on the home page. Forms can also be mailed to your home. Please provide your license and health insurance card if applicable.




Why are my teeth sensitive?


Tooth sensitivity pain can be brought on by hot, cold, sweet, or acidic drinks or foods. When the enamel from your teeth begins to thin due to exposure of the mentioned drinks/foods. This can be a result of receding gums, night time teeth grinding, chipped teeth, fillings, and sometimes whitening. Contact our office if you're experiencing teeth sensitivity so we can help you resolve the issue and find comfort.




How can I prevent gum disease and tooth decay?


The best prevention starts at home by brushing twice a day and flossing . Consuming a healthy diet and visiting the dentist for professional cleanings, check up x-rays will help prevent dental dilemmas. Individual needs will be discussed at your dental appoinment .




How many times a year should I get my teeth cleaned?


Dental health will vary for every person depending on the state of their dental health. Getting your teeth cleaned every six months or twice a year is important for maintaining a healthy smile. Many people need or choose to have more often visits depending on their individual dental situation. Frequency will be discussed with your dentist.




When do children's teeth grow and fall out?


Between the ages of 6-8 yers old your child's teeth will begin to fall out typically in the order they grew in. It can take up to age 12 for all baby teeth to fall out . It is always a good idea to check in with you dentist if things seem out of sorts since there are many exceptions to the norm. Feel free to call and ask any questions pertaining to your child's teeth.




At what age should I bring my child to the dentist?


The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends bringing your child in after their first tooth grows in. Children can begin developing cavities around the age of two.




How can I whiten my teeth?


Tooth whitening is a cost effective and safe procedure to create a beautiful, healthy smile. Over the years, flouride has been added to the whitening product. This reduces the risk of tooth and gum sensitivity. Tooth Whitening must be monitored by your dentist and only done after a comprehensive exam and hygiene cleaning.

The whitening process can last for a number of years if maintained properly. Beverages such as coffee, tea, cola and wine will reduce the lasting effect. Remember, if it could stain a white shirt, it will stain your smile!




What is bonding?


Bonding is a cost effective procedure used to fill gaps in front teeth and to change a tooth’s color. The immediate results are amazing. Within a few hours, you will have a great smile! Bonding, like tooth whitening, may change color over time due to coffee, tea, cola and wine.




What is a crown?


Crowns( called caps sometimes) are a cemented covering of the entire tooth. It looks and functions like a real tooth returning strength, form and function to a badly damaged tooth. It is also used for cosmetic enhancements ,filling spaces, hiding ugly discolorations and changing uneveen or distoted shapes. It can both change or duplicate the size, shape and color of your tooth. In our office, our technology allows most crowns to be done in ONE visit !




What is a dental implant?


A dental implant is a “man-made” replacement for a missing tooth or tooth root. Made from titanium, this screw-like object is inserted under the gum and directly into the upper or lower jaw bone. There is usually minimal discomfort involved with this procedure. After a period of a few months, the dental implant and the bone fuse together. This creates an anchor for the new tooth to be placed onto the dental implant.




What is a veneer?


Porcelain Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain that go directly on your natural teeth. This entire procedure can take as few as two visits. Veneers change the size, shape and color of a patient’s teeth. This procedure is used to repair fractured teeth, teeth darkened by age or medication, or a crooked smile. Many times, patients ask for porcelain veneers to simply feel and look younger with a straighter, whiter smile!




What is the difference between silver and white fillings?


Silver fillings, known as amalgam, have been around for decades. They are a combination of metal alloys including Mercury and were, for a long time, the only option for fillings.

White fillings, also known as composites, are made of plastic or glass polymers
(NO Mercury) .These cosmetic fillings allow us to fill a cavity with a substance that will look and act just like your existing tooth structure. This restoration is created with a resin material and bonds tightly into a tooth. Rather than a gray or silver material in your mouth, the composite color will match the tooth color with the newest versions providing similar strength and longevity as the older amalgam fillings.




What is gingivitis?


Gingivitis is a condition caused when bacteria surrounds the teeth and enters the gums. The gums can become irritated, inflamed and often bleed. In order to prevent the condition from worsening, regular hygiene visits are highly recommended. During your visit, our Hygiene team will teach you the proper flossing techniques and oral hygiene protocol for home care.




What is periodontal disease?


Periodontal Disease is a quiet disease that begins with little or no symptoms. It is caused by bacteria that surrounds the teeth and enters the gums. The immediate condition is known as ‘gingivitis’. The gums become irritated, inflamed and often bleed. If not properly treated, the condition worsens. Noticeable symptoms now appear. They include: Bad Breath Gum Recession Gum Sensitivity to Acidic Foods Abscesses Tooth Pain Tooth Loss Periodontal disease is a chronic condition that needs immediate attention. Through a series of periodontal cleanings, root planing & scaling, laser therapy and local antibiotics, this condition can be controlled. Periodontal surgery is only necessary for severe cases.




Post OP Instructions?


It is important to follow instructions after you have oral surgery to ensure proper healing and to avoid complications. As a rule of thumb, you should always wait two hours after surgery before eating to let the anesthesia wear off. Trying to eat before this could result in soft tissue damage because you are not able to feel all of your mouth. The instructions found below are guidelines. After your surgery the doctor or dental assistant will give you full instructions on how to properly recover from surgery.

Root Canal Therapy
You can expect soreness after a root canal procedure for a few days. You should avoid chewing on the side of your mouth where the procedure was performed so you do not irritate the area and also to ensure that the temporary restorative material properly sets. You will also need to take an antibiotic to treat any remaining infection in your tooth. If you notice an increasing amount of pain or tenderness, a reaction to the medication, or the loss of the temporary restoration (filling) call your dentist immediately.

Crowns and Bridges
Before you receive your permanent crown/bridge you will first receive a temporary restoration. This is not as sturdy as the permanent version, so you should be careful when cleaning and eating. You should brush the area gently and should not pull up on the tooth when flossing because it could become dislodged. The same goes for eating. You should avoid sticky or chewy foods while you have the temporary in.

There may be some sensitivity and irritation after the temporary or permanent is placed. This is normal and will subside after the soft tissue heals. A warm salt water rinse will help, and you can also take Advil or Tylenol if the pain does not go away.

When the permanent crown or bridge is placed it may feel a little awkward for a few days. Your mouth needs to adjust to the new tooth, and it should feel like one of your natural tooth in less than a week. If your bite feels abnormal in any way, you should let your dentist know. Caring for your bridge or crown is just like caring for your own teeth. You should brush and floss regularly.

White Fillings (Bonding)
After the anesthesia wears off your teeth will likely be sensitive. You should avoid hot and cold food or drink for the next few days. After that initial period, your treated teeth will feel as good as new. Continue your normal hygiene plan to ensure that your fillings last for a long time.

Scaling and Root Planing
After this procedure your gums will probably be slightly sore and irritated for a few days. You should rinse your mouth with warm salt water (1 tsp salt/8 oz water) 2-3 times a day. This will relieve the pain and cleanse the area. Brushing and flossing should be continued right after the procedure, but you should brush gently so that you do not further irritate the area. If you experience any swelling or stiffness in the area you can place a cold compress on the area and take some pain relieving medicine. Avoid any hard or chewy foods for 2-3 days after the surgery to ensure the area heals correctly. If you continue to experience pain or swelling after a few days contact your dentist.

Veneers
Before you receive your permanent veneer you will first receive a temporary restoration. This is not as sturdy as the permanent version, so you should be careful when cleaning and eating. You should brush the area gently and should not pull up on the tooth when flossing because it could become dislodged. The same goes for eating. You should avoid sticky or chewy foods while you have the temporary in.

There may be some sensitivity and irritation after the temporary or permanent is placed. This is normal and will subside after the soft tissue heals. A warm salt water rinse will help, and you can also take Advil or Tylenol if the pain does not go away.

When the veneer is placed it may feel a little awkward for a few days. Your mouth needs to adjust to the new tooth, and it should feel like one of your natural tooth in less than a week. If your bite feels abnormal in any way, you should let your dentist know. When brushing and flossing you should pay close attention to the area between the veneer and the tooth at the gum line.

Extractions
After the surgery you will need to rest. You need to be driven home by a friend or family member because of the anesthesia. You can expect for the extraction site to bleed for a little while after the surgery. Gauze will be applied at the completion of the surgery, and you will need to change it when it becomes soaked. If bleeding continues for longer than 24 hours you should call your dentist. Rest when you return home, but do not lie flat. This could prolong the bleeding. Prop your head up on a pillow when lying down. Your dentist will prescribe you pain medication, so if you become sore take as directed. You can also use an ice pack for the pain. Your dentist might also provide you with a cleaning solution to clean the extraction site.

You will be limited to soft foods for a few days after your surgery. Some recommended foods are:
Gelatin Pudding Yogurt Mashed Potatoes Ice Cream Thin Soups ...and other food you can eat without chewing.

When drinking, make sure you do not use a straw. The sucking motion can loosen your sutures and slow the clotting process. The same goes for smoking. If you have prolonged pain, bleeding, irritation, or don't feel that the extraction site is healing properly call your dentist for a follow up.





Call for emergencies

 

115 Thoreau street

Concord, MA 01742

Dr.Vultaggio@mdofficemail.com

978 - 371 - 2792

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© 2021 by Stephen M Vultaggio, DDS, PC.

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